The Art of Sabrage

“Sabrage /səˈbrɑːʒ/ is a technique for opening a champagne bottle with a saber,[1] used for ceremonial occasions. The wielder slides the saber along the body of the bottle to break the top of the neck away, leaving the neck of the bottle open and ready to pour. The force of the blunt side of the blade hitting the lip breaks the glass to separate the collar from the neck of the bottle. One does not use the sharp side of the blade. The cork and collar remain together after separating from the neck.”  Wikipedia

The origins of Sabrage are said to have come from Napoleon’s troops who received gifts of Champagne from people as they rode from their victory ground. They could not open the bottle with one hand on the reign and used their sabres to dislodge the bottle tops.

 

Hear ye,   Hear ye,  Hear ye,

The gallant and bold Knighte, Sir Peter James did celebrate his 75 years in the country home of Roosentjiebosch.

Twas a fair day and there were much merrymente.  Many a fair maiden did abound and greate were the celebration on that day.

Much were spoken of Sir Peter’s days of gallant jousting and his victories for the pleasure of the Kinge

There were not much quaffing of ale, but rather sweete wine;  great laughter could be hearde coming forth from the garden.

As eve drew nigh it was charged that Sir Peter should demonstrate his great skill of Sabrage to the fair maidens.

Sir Peter were schooled in the ancient art of Sabrage, by The Lorde Gilles of Watermeyer and attended many a display before the Kinge.

As an honourable Knight, he did, with great ease and speed draw his trustie sabre, as a vessel of the sweete wine was placed in his hande.

That great Knighte proceeded in one deft movement of his blade, to remove the top of the vessel and release the nectar from within.

The maidens, with one voice, applauded that bold and skilfule Knighte and the day were won.

 

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